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API Designer Certification Exam Answers – API Academy

API Designer Certification
  • The industry they operate in.
  • The size of their organization – whether startup or enterprise.
  • Their level of familiarity with APIs and API architecture.
  • Their dietary preference.
  • The platform they are using or creating applications for.
  • Scalability
  • Security
  • Cost
  • True
  • False
  • The Revision number is relevant the most to the Test Team.
  • The Major release number is relevant the most to the Test Team.
  • All options are correct.
  • The Minor release number is relevant the most to the Build Team
  • Feedback & Analysis
  • Scalability & Evolvability
  • Readiness & Identification
  • Alignment & Usefulness
  • Manageability & Security
  • Engagement & Usability
  • Change Management
  • High Functionality
  • Trust
  • Market Engagement
  • Provide a platform on which the developer can start reading about what APIs are available and what can be done with them.
  • None of the options are correct. Your APIs should be self-explanatory to the right users or developers.
  • Provide use cases that demonstrate the business practicality of your API.
  • Provide a playground explorer environment.
  • Trust -> “The way you communicate to your developer audience is crucial to how they perceive you and your product.”
  • Visibility -> “It is important that developers are able to see how their user base is interacting with their application in relation to the APIs.”
  • Education -> “Make it simple for developers to create powerful applications, fast, for example by providing comprehensive, easy-to-use documentation.”
  • Change Management -> “Provide a clear release history, to easily track new and deprecated features and bugs, no matter which version a user is running.”
  • Troubleshooting -> “Developer tool is only as good as the functionality it delivers. Are we providing clear error messages? Are we tracking defects and fixing them?”
  • Care exclusively about technology.
  • Synthesize multiple perspectives from API stakeholders.
  • Anticipate future changes to the business.
  • All options are correct.
  • Outsourced Innovation -> Publishing a public API can lead to unanticipated innovation from third party developers.
  • Reach and Retention -> APIs allow content and service providers to reach captive audiences where they spend their time.
  • Mobile and Omnichannel -> Offering services through APIs is the best way to provide consistent digital experiences across all channels.
  • Interaction Analysis -> A lot of value in APIs comes from understanding your customers better through their use of your APIs.
  • Make all new changes to the API mandatory
  • Never change the meaning of existing things in your API
  • Make all new changes to the API optional
  • Never take anything away  from the functionality of your existing API
  • Infrastructure Cost -> The wrong approach can lead to unnecessary and unwieldy expenses.
  • Scalability -> Addressing this challenge early on in the process can help define early adoption, future success, and the lifespan of the API.
  • Security -> Addressing this challenge helps you control the access of legitimate API consumers and protect endpoints against malicious traffic.
  • Who are the developers who will attract clients to my APIs?
  • How do I attract and retain the right consumers and developers?
  • What factors will affect the runtime scalability of my APIs?
  • Who are the intended and expected consumers of my APIs?
  • Caching layer -> Provides optimized response handling to offload backend application processing.
  • Representation layer -> Provides a consumer-centric view of the data or service that an API is exposing.
  • Orchestration layer -> Aggregates and composes data from multiple backend sources.
  • Tunnel Style -> SOAP
  • URL Style -> CRUD
  • Hypermedia Style -> REST
  • Event-Driven Style -> WebSockets
  • False
  • True
  • False
  • True
  • Securtiy
  • Caching
  • Basic
  • Advanced
  • Representation
  • Orchestration
  • True
  • False
  • How do I add a new mandatory input parameter to requests without breaking existing clients? -> You can use default values to support existing clients.
  • How do I add new properties  to responses  without breaking  existing  clients? ->Make sure that your clients ignore properties or objects that they don’t understand.
  • What if I’m forced to change the meaning of something? -> Add a new property or object and don’t change the existing one.
  • False
  • True
  • “Be conservative in what you send, be liberal in what you accept”
  • “Deal with unexpected elements by always being conservative”
  • “Always be liberal with your requests and responses”
  • “Be liberal in what you send, be conservative in what you accept”
  • System Stability
  • Scalability
  • All options are correct
  • Delivery Speed
  • Designers may lack time, budget, and/or skills.
  • A well-designed interface should protect the end user from the details of the underlying systems.
  • A designer’s internal perspective and specialized knowledge could leak out into design in a way that makes little sense or add no value to an external developer.
  • Many organizations segregate the decision makers and users from the designers and teams tasked with implementation and testing.
  • Technical purity shouldn’t always win.
  • Determine goals
  • Identify users
  • Design Interface
  • Evaluate
  • Implement
  • Uses a WSDL file to describe its interface
  • Uses a WADL file to describe its interface
  • Uses HTTP as a transport protocol
  • Uses an XML-centric message format
  • This API style is limited to existing HTTP operations.
  • This API style uses hyperlinks and requires the client to understand the relations between hyperlinks.
  • This API style has stack dependency that would often tie you into a particular tool chain.
  • True
  • False
  • Mobile and Omnichannel
  • Self-Service Integration
  • New Revenue
  • Interaction Analysis
  • CRUD
  • REST
  • DX
  • API
  • True
  • False
  • URI/CRUD API
  • Tunnel/SOAP API
  • Hypermedia/REST API
  • Event-driven/Reactive API
  • Alignment & Usefulness -> API Roadmap and Project Cross Reference. Organizational Model. API Business Models and Business Cases.
  • Engagement & Usability -> Developer Program. API and DX Design Principles. API Consumer Toolkits.
  • Scalability & Evolvability -> API Architecture Guidelines. Full API Lifecycle Methodology. Technology Roadmaps.
  • False
  • True
  • Security -> The API is protected against attack and misuse.
  • Usability -> The API is easy for developers to effectively leverage.
  • Scalability -> The API is able to handle rapid spikes in traffic.
  • Testability -> The API is designed to help developers experiment with functionality.
  • Reliability -> The API is robust enough to minimize downtime.

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