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LinkedIn C++ Certification Exam Answers

LinkedIn is a social networking platform primarily used for professional networking and career development. While it’s not specifically designed for learning programming languages like C++, it does offer various resources and communities where you can engage with professionals in the field. Here’s a brief introduction to using LinkedIn for C++:

  1. Profile Creation: Create a professional profile highlighting your experience, skills, and projects related to C++. This is your online resume and the first impression you give to potential employers or collaborators.
  2. Networking: Connect with other professionals in the field of C++ development. You can search for people by job title, company, or skills related to C++.
  3. Join Groups: Join LinkedIn groups dedicated to C++ programming. These groups often share valuable resources, job postings, and discussions related to C++ development. Some popular groups include “C++ Developers” and “C++ Programming Language.”
  4. Follow Influencers: Follow influencers or thought leaders in the C++ community. They often share insights, articles, and updates about the language and its ecosystem.
  5. Learning Resources: While LinkedIn itself may not offer comprehensive C++ tutorials, you can find learning resources indirectly through articles, posts, and shared content by professionals in the field. Many professionals share their knowledge and insights on the platform.
  6. Job Opportunities: LinkedIn is a popular platform for job seekers and recruiters. You can search for C++ job opportunities, set up job alerts, and even directly apply for positions through the platform.
  7. Engage with Content: Like, comment, and share content related to C++ programming. Engaging with other professionals’ posts can help you expand your network and visibility within the C++ community.

Remember to keep your interactions and profile professional, as LinkedIn is primarily a platform for career development and networking. By actively engaging with the C++ community on LinkedIn, you can stay updated with the latest trends, job opportunities, and learning resources in the field.

LinkedIn C++ Exam Quiz Answers

  • The compiled code is always bigger because of all of the imported symbols.
  • If the code uses a function defined in two different libraries with the same prototype but possibly with different implementations, there will be a compilation error due to ambiguity.
  • It automatically includes all header files in the standard library (cstdint, cstdlib, cstdio, iostream, etc).
  • It causes the compiler to enforce the exclusive inclusion of header files belonging to the standard library, generating compilation error when a different header file is included.
  • 7 bits.
  • 25 bytes.
  • 1 bit.
  • 1 byte.
  • Error
  • v1: {1,2,3,4}; v2:{5};
  • v1: {1,2,3,4,5}; v2: {1,2,3,4,5};
  • v1: {1,2,3,4}; v2: {1,2,3,5};
  • While pointers are variable that hold memory address, iterators are generic functions used to traverse containers. This function allows the programmer to implement read and write code as the container is traversed.
  • Incrementing an iterator always means access the next element in the container (if any), no matter the container. Incrementing the pointer means pointing to the next element in memory, not always the next element.
  • Pointers are variables that hold memory address whereas iterator are unsigned integers that refers to offsets in arrays.
  • All iterator are implemented with pointers so all iterators are pointers but not all pointers are iterators.
  • The argument is passed as a reference, so the function receives a copy that can be modified without affecting the original value.
  • The argument is passed as a reference, so if the passed my_array object is large, the program will require less time and memory.
  • Actually, objects can’t be passed as regular variables because they require a constructor call. Therefore, a const reference is the only way to pass class instances to functions.
  • There are no benefits because a reference and an object are treated as the same thing.
  • 4 bytes
  • 7 bytes
  • 8 bytes
  • 2 bytes
  • ?:
  • new
  • ::
  • .
  • *v1: {1,2,3,4}; *v2:{5};
  • *v1: {1,2,3,4,5}; *v2: {1,2,3,4,5};
  • Error
  • *v1: {1,2,3,4}; *v2: {1,2,3,5};
  • Because structs are part of the C programming language, there are some complexities between C and C++ structs. This is not the case with classes.
  • Classes may have member functions; structs are private.
  • The default access specifier for members of struct is public, whereas for member of class, it is private.
  • Template type parameters can be declared with classes, but not with the struct keyword.
  • A

typedef struct {

int sunday:1;

int monday:1;

// more days

int friday:1;

int saturday:1;

} weekdays;

  • B

typedef char [7]: weekdays;

  • C

typedef struct {

bit sunday:1;

bit monday:1;

// more days

bit friday:1;

bit saturday:1;

} weekdays;

  • D

typedef struct {

bit sunday;

bit monday;

// more days

bit friday;

bit saturday;

} weekdays;

  • It’s a constant expression, meaning an expression composed of constants and operations.
  • It’s an expression that represents an object with an address.
  • It’s an expression suitable for the left-hand side operand in a binary operation.
  • It’s a location value, meaning a memory address suitable for assigning to a pointer or reference.
  • It specifies that the type of x will be deduced from the initializer – in this case, double.
  • It specifies that the type of x is automatic meaning that if can be assigned different types of data throughout the program.
  • It specifies that x is a variable with automatic storage duration.
  • It specifies that more memory will be allocated for x in case it needs more space, avoiding loss of data due to overflow.
  • class written with the generic programming paradigm, specifying behavior in terms of type parameter rather than specific type.
  • blank superclass intended for inheritance and polymorphism.
  • lass that only consists of member variable, with no constructor, destructor nor member functions.
  • skeleton source code for a class where the programmer has to fill in specific parts to define the data types and algorithms used.
  • y=a? b:x;
  • y=if (x? a: b);
  • y=(x&a)? a:(x&b)? b:0;
  • y=x? a: b;
  • The first is a variable declaration that will hold an element in a sequence. The second is the sequence to traverse.
  • The first is an iterator, and the second is the increment value to be added to the iterator.
  • The first is the iterating variable. The second is an std: pair that specifies the range (start and end) in which the variable will iterate.
  • The first is a container object. The second is an std: pair that specifies the range (start and end) in which the elements will be accessed within the loop.
  • Part A executes because x==5 (true) and y==2 (true), thus the AND operation evaluates as true.
  • Part B executes because (x & y) results in 0, or false.
  • Part A executes because (x & y) results in a nonzero value, or true.
  • Part B executes because the statement (x & y) is invalid, thus false.
  • A

int get_length (char *str) {

int count=0;

while(str[count++]);

return count-1;

}

  • B

int get_length (char *str) {

int count=0;

while (str! =NULL) {

count++;

str++;

}

return count;

}

  • C

int get_length (char *str) {

int count=0;

while((*str) ++)

count++;

return count;

}

  • D

int get_length (char *str) {

int count=0;

while(str++)

count++;

return count;

}

  • std: list
  • std: vector
  • std: priority_queue
  • std: map
  • The first is the iterating variable name, the second is the number of times to iterate, and the third is the desired increment or decrement (specified with a signed integer).
  • The first is the initialization block, the second is the condition to iterate, and the third is the increment block.
  • The first is the iterating variable, the second is the container in which it should operate, and the third is an exit condition to abort at any time.
  • The first is the iterating variable name, the second is the starting value for the iterating variable, and the third is the stop value (the last value plus one).
  • False
  • 0
  • 1
  • This code has an error.
  • void *ptr;
  • It is a pointer initialized at NULL.
  • It is a pointer to a void function.
  • That declaration causes a compiler error, as pointers must specify a type.
  • It is a pointer to a value with no specific type, so it may be cast to point to any type.
  • Public members are the same as global variables, so every part of the code has access to them. Private members are the same as automatic variables, so only their class has access to them.
  • Public members are made accessible to any running application. Private members are made accessible only to the application where the object is instantiated.
  • Public members will be compiled as shared variables in a multithreaded environment. Private members will be compiled as Thread-local variables.
  • Public members can be accessed by any function. Private members can be accessed only by the same class’s member functions and the friends of the class.
  • 3
  • 7
  • -3
  • 13
  • Only classes can have member variables and methods.
  • C++ supports multiple inheritance.
  • C++ supports only single inheritance.
  • Only structs can inherit.
  • float f=*(float)ptr;
  • float f= (float *) ptr;
  • float f=(float)*ptr;
  • float f=*(float *) ptr;
  • It is the same as the class member access operator, or arrow operator (->), which allows you to access a member of an object through a pointer to the object.
  • It is the pointer to member operator, and it allows you to access a member of an object through a pointer to that specific class member.
  • It is the member access with address of operator, which returns the address of a class or struct member.
  • It is a combination of the member access operator (.) and the dereference operator (*), so it allows you to access the object that a member pointer points to.
  • A

c = buff [16];

c = str [5];

c = *(buff+16);

c = *(str+5);

  • B

c = *(buff [15]);

c = *(str [4]);

c = buff+15;

c = str+4;

  • C

c = buff [15];

c = str [4];

c = *(buff+15);

c = *(str+4);

  • D

c = *(buff [16]);

c = *(str [5]);

c = buff+16;

c = str+5;

  • A

class Dog: public Animal {

//….

};

  • B

class Dog: public Animal {

//….

};

  • C

public class Animal: Dog {

//….

};

  • D

public class Dog extends Animal {

//….

};

  • by simply calling the C code
  • there is no way for C++ to call a C function
  • by using extern “C”
  • by importing the source C code
  • A

typedef struct coord {

int x;

int y;

};

  • B

typedef struct coord {

int x;

int y;

} coord;

  • C

typedef struct {

int x;

int y;

} coord;

  • D

struct coord {

int x;

int y;

};

typedef struct coord coord;

  • A

i=1;

while(i<10) {

cout<<++i<<endl;

}

  • B

for (int i: {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9}) {

cout<<i<<endl;

}

  • C

i = 1;

do {

cout<<i++<<endl;

} while(i<10);

  • D

i = 1;

loop:

cout<<i++<<endl;

if(i<10) goto loop;

  • It causes the toolchain to compile all the contents of library.h so that its executable code is available when needed by the final application.
  • It cherry picks library.h for the declarations and definitions of all data and functions used in the remainder of the source file main.cpp, finally replacing the #include directive by those declarations and definitions.
  • It informs the linker that some functions or data used in the source file main.cpp are contained in library.h, so that they can be called in run time. This is also known as dynamic linking.
  • It causes the replacement of the #include directive by the entire contents of the source file library.h. This is similar to a Copy-Paste operation of library.h into main.cpp.
  • A

#ifdef MY_LIBRARY_H

#define MY_LIBRARY_H

// my_library.h content

#endif /* MY_LIBRARY_H */

  • B

#ifndef MY_LIBRARY_H

#define MY_LIBRARY_H

// my_library.h content

#endif /* MY_LIBRARY_H */

  • C

#ifdef MY_LIBRARY_H

#undef MY_LIBRARY_H

// my_library.h content

#endif /* MY_LIBRARY_H */

  • D

#define MY_LIBRARY_H

#include MY_LIBRARY_H

// my_library.h content

#undef MY_LIBRARY_H

  • There’s nothing wrong with it.
  • An std: vector cannot contain more std: vector containers as its elements.
  • The correct syntax should be: std: vector [std: vector[int]] thematrix;
  • >> is parsed as the shift-right operator, and thus results in a compile error.
  • sprite.x
  • sprite. *x
  • (*sprite).x
  • *Sprite.x
  • A

complexNumber (float real, float im) {

this->real = real_part;

this->im = im_part;

}

  • B

complexNumber (float real, float im) {

this->real_part(real);

this->im_part(im);

}

  • C

complexNumber (float real, float im) {

this->real_part = real;

this->im_part = im;

}

  • D

complexNumber (float real, float im) {

this->real_part = &real;

this->im_part = &im;

}

  • Part A executes because the expression (~x || y) always results in true if y==false.
  • Part B executes because the statement (~x || y) is invalid, thus false.
  • Part A executes because ~x is not zero, meaning true.
  • Part B executes because ~x is false and y is false, thus the OR operation evaluates as false.
  • 0.54 2.71828 3.14159 5.499999 10.0
  • 1 3 4 6 11
  • 0 2 3 5 10
  • 1 3 3 5 10
  • std: priority_queue
  • std: list
  • std: vector
  • std: map
  • It renames text1.txt to text2.txt.
  • It makes a directory called text2.txt and moves text1.txt there.
  • It copies the contents of text1.txt into text2.txt – i.e., it makes a copy of text1.txt, named text2.txt.
  • It appends the contents of text1.txt into text2.txt – i.e., replaces the contents of text2.txt by the concatenation of text2.txt and text1.txt.
  • The variable cannot be modified by any part of the code in the same application or thread. However, other threads may modify it.
  • The variable exists even when no objects of the class have been defined so it can be modified at any point in the source code.
  • The variable is allocated only once, regardless of how many objects are instantiated because it is bound to the class itself, not its instances.
  • All objects that try to access their count member variable actually refer to the only class-bound static count variable.
  • double
  • long float
  • long double
  • float
  • There is no output because there is an exception when comparing an int8_t with a uint8_t.
  • greater
  • less
  • There is no output because there is a compiler error.
  • delete(my_object);
  • free(my_object);
  • The garbage collector will destroy the object eventually.
  • Exiting the scope will destroy the object.
  • grades. count ();
  • my_array->count ();
  • grades->count ();
  • my_array. count ();
  • There is no output. The code causes a compiler error because nums is an array of references, which is illegal.
  • 846
  • The output is the addresses of i2, i0, and i1, in that order, with no spaces.
  • 468
  • It declares a memory buffer named buff that starts at address 20 and ends at address 70.
  • It sets all bits in the array named buffer from its element at index 20 to its element at index 50.
  • It writes the value 20 in every memory address from buff to buff+49.
  • It declares a memory buffer named buff that starts at address 20 and ends at address 50.
  • CustomData& operator++ ();
  • void operator++(CustomData);
  • CustomData operator++(CustomData);
  • CustomData operator++(int);
  • A

std: sort (my_array. begin (), my_array.end (),

[] (uint32_t a, uint32_t b) {

return a < b;

})

  • B

lambda (uint32_t a, uint32_t b) {

return a < b;

}

std: sort (my_array. begin (), my_array.end (), lambda);

  • C

std: sort (my_array. begin (), my_array.end (),

lambda (uint32_t a, uint32_t b) {

return a < b;

})

  • D

lambda (uint32_t a, uint32_t b) {

return a < b;

}

std: sort (my_array. begin (), my_array.end (), &lambda);

  • A

void std: mutex: lock () {

while (! this->try_lock ());

}

  • B

void std: mutex: lock () {

return (this->try_lock ());

}

  • C

void std: mutex: lock () {

while (1)

this->try_lock ();

}

  • D

void std: mutex: lock () {

while(this->try_lock ());

}

  • It allows the programmer to write the necessary code to free the resources acquired by the object prior to deleting the object itself.
  • It deletes an object. One example of a destructor is the delete () function.
  • It terminates a program. This may be achieved as a regular function call or as an exception.
  • There are no destructors in C++.
  • std: priority_queue
  • std: map
  • std: vector
  • std: list
  • lock () has a higher privilege over try_lock (). This means that you have a better chance of acquiring a mutex with lock ().
  • Both attempts to acquire a lock, but lock () blocks if the mutex is not available, whereas try_lock () returns whether the mutex is available or not.
  • lock () enforces preemption, whereas try_lock () suggests preemption.
  • If the mutex is not available, try_lock () returns with a corresponding code, whereas lock () snatches the mutex from the thread that currently has it.
  • Actually, objects cannot be passed as regular variables, because they require a constructor call. Therefore, a const reference is the only way to pass class instances to functions.
  • There are no benefits because a reference and an object are treated as the same thing.
  • The const qualifier Forbids the code to modify the argument, so the programmer can rest assured that the source object will remain unchanged.
  • The argument is passed as a reference, so the Function receives a copy that can be modified without affecting the original variable.
  • a preprocessor directive that prevents inconsistent behaviors in lines that contain the #ifdef, #ifndef, or #elif directives
  • a compiler option that prevents the user code from including additional libraries
  • a preprocessor statement that prevents a source file from being included more than once in a project
  • a library that adds safety features such as mutexes, watchdog timers, and assertions to the project
  • public:

Sprite ();

  • private:

void Sprite ();

  • public:

void Sprite ();

  • private:

Sprite ();

  • to restrict the use of its contents to only one source file
  • to tell the compiler that only one variable can be instantiated from the classes or types contained in this header file
  • to help the compiler finish faster by assuring that only one compiler pass is neccessary for the code included in this header file
  • to make the compiler parse that header file only once, even if it is included multiple times in the source
  • a 2-tuple
  • an integer numbers
  • a floating point numbers
  • a string with more than 255 characters
  • bool is_even (float f); bool is_even (char *str);
  • bool is_even (float f); bool is_even (char str);
  • bool is_even_float (float f); bool is_even_str (char *str);
  • float is_even (float f); char *is_even (char *str);
  • shifting characters to the left in a string.
  • inserting characters into an output stream like std: cout.
  • comparing floating point numbers as less-than.
  • assigning a variable to a reference.
  • Yes, it causes a compiler error because the colon character is not allowed in struct definitions.
  • and child_t is a type defined as a structure with bit fields. It has 4 bits for age and 1 bit for gender in the first byte, and 2 bits for size in the second byte.
  • Yes, it causes a compiler error because there is an unnamed field.
  • Yes, it causes a compiler error because one field is defined as having a size of 0.
  • The compiler needs the dara type to make sure that the pointer is not going to be used on illegal non-pointable types such as functions, labels, pointers, and reference.
  • void * does not work for any type. The language does not allow assigning anything other than void to a pointer to void *.
  • The compiler needs the data type to know how much memory to allocate for the pointer, because different data types require different pointer lengths.
  • Yes, it causes a compiler error because one field is defined as having a size of 0.
  • The main function is supposed to have a void return type.
  • std: cin and std: cout are invalid. The correct names for the character input and output streams are cin and cout.
  • The address of str is supposed to be used. That is &str instead of str.
  • The input operator flow is inverted. it should start from std: cin and then flow (>>) into str.
  • A.B.C.D
  • *A.*B.*C.*D
  • &A.&B.&C.&D
  • *(*((*A). B).C). D
  • All objects that try to access their count member variable actually refer to the only class-bound static count variable.
  • The variable is allocated only once, regardless of how many objects are instantiated, because it is bound to the class itself, not its instances.
  • The variable existd when no objects of the class have been defined, so it can be modified at any point in the source code.
  • The variable cannot be modified by any part of the code in the same application or thread. However, other threads may modify it.
  • int anInt = new int (11);
  • int* anInt = new int [11];
  • int anInt = new int [11];
  • int* anInt = new int (11);
  • an integer number of at least 32 bits
  • a string with more than 255 characters
  • a pointer
  • a 64-bit floating point number
  • struct
  • union
  • enum
  • namespace
  • marks[“Sinead”] = 22
  • marks[“Sinead”].22
  • marks[“Sinead”] -> 22
  • marks[“Sinead”].value = 22
  • The std: sort function is a template. The programmer is free to enter the sorting algorithm in a function object as an argument.
  • Actually, std: sort takes only one argument, which is the container to be sorted.
  • std: sort operates on a template container. The compiler does not know how to relationally compare the values it contains, so a function must be provided to do the comparison.
  • std: sort will use the parameter function as an error handler. The function will be called if an error occurs.
  • 6 will be printed on standard output, with no compilation warnings generated.
  • 5 will be printed on standard output, with no compilation warnings generated.
  • 6 will be printed on standard output, with compilation warnings generated.
  • 5 will be printed on standard output, with compilation warnings generated.

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LinkedIn .NET Framework Certification Exam Answers

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